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MySQL : Installation on Linux

Installation

If you want to run the most recent versions, you can use the MySQL Yum repository available here. Download and install the repository package.

# rpm -Uvh mysql-community-release-el6-4.noarch.rpm

With the repository in place, you can install the latest version using the same command shown previously.

# yum install mysql mysql-server -y

If you want MySQL Workbench, issue the following installation command.

# yum install mysql-workbench -y

If you don't need the latest MySQL version, you can use the version present in the regular RHEL/Oracle Linux distribution.

Start the MySQL Service (mysqld)

Make sure the mysqld service is set to start on reboot and start the service. On startup the service will prompt you with information on how to secure the installation.

# chkconfig mysqld on
# service mysqld start
Initializing MySQL database:  Installing MySQL system tables...
OK
Filling help tables...
OK

To start mysqld at boot time you have to copy
support-files/mysql.server to the right place for your system

PLEASE REMEMBER TO SET A PASSWORD FOR THE MySQL root USER !
To do so, start the server, then issue the following commands:

/usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root password 'new-password'
/usr/bin/mysqladmin -u root -h rhce1.localdomain password 'new-password'

Alternatively you can run:
/usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation

which will also give you the option of removing the test
databases and anonymous user created by default.  This is
strongly recommended for production servers.

See the manual for more instructions.

You can start the MySQL daemon with:
cd /usr ; /usr/bin/mysqld_safe &

You can test the MySQL daemon with mysql-test-run.pl
cd /usr/mysql-test ; perl mysql-test-run.pl

Please report any problems with the /usr/bin/mysqlbug script!

                                                           [  OK  ]
Starting mysqld:                                           [  OK  ]
#

Basic Configuration

Make sure SELinux is running in permissive mode, so you can change the locations of the MySQL files.

# setenforce Permissive

Make the setting permanent, by editing the "/etc/selinux/config" file, setting the following value.

SELINUX=permissive

Create directories to hold data and binary logs.

# mkdir -p /u01/data
# mkdir -p /u01/log_bin
# chown -R mysql:mysql /u01
# chmod -R 755 /u01

Stop the mysqld service.

# service mysqld stop

Edit the "/etc/my.cnf" file, setting the following values in the "[mysqld]" section. Be sure to reflect any path changes you require in these settings.

user=mysql
log_bin=/u01/log_bin/myDB
datadir=/u01/data

Start the mysqld service.

# service mysqld start

Secure the Installation

As suggested by the startup output, run the "/usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation" script to secure the installation. Hit return when prompted for the root password and pick all the default options.

# /usr/bin/mysql_secure_installation




NOTE: RUNNING ALL PARTS OF THIS SCRIPT IS RECOMMENDED FOR ALL MySQL
      SERVERS IN PRODUCTION USE!  PLEASE READ EACH STEP CAREFULLY!


In order to log into MySQL to secure it, we'll need the current
password for the root user.  If you've just installed MySQL, and
you haven't set the root password yet, the password will be blank,
so you should just press enter here.

Enter current password for root (enter for none): 
OK, successfully used password, moving on...

Setting the root password ensures that nobody can log into the MySQL
root user without the proper authorisation.

Set root password? [Y/n] Y
New password: 
Re-enter new password: 
Password updated successfully!
Reloading privilege tables..
 ... Success!


By default, a MySQL installation has an anonymous user, allowing anyone
to log into MySQL without having to have a user account created for
them.  This is intended only for testing, and to make the installation
go a bit smoother.  You should remove them before moving into a
production environment.

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] Y
 ... Success!

Normally, root should only be allowed to connect from 'localhost'.  This
ensures that someone cannot guess at the root password from the network.

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] Y
 ... Success!

By default, MySQL comes with a database named 'test' that anyone can
access.  This is also intended only for testing, and should be removed
before moving into a production environment.

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] Y
 - Dropping test database...
 ... Success!
 - Removing privileges on test database...
 ... Success!

Reloading the privilege tables will ensure that all changes made so far
will take effect immediately.

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] Y
 ... Success!

Cleaning up...



All done!  If you've completed all of the above steps, your MySQL
installation should now be secure.

Thanks for using MySQL!


#

You are now ready to start using MySQL.

There are additional hardening steps you should consider, as described here.

Create Database

The first thing you will probably want to do is create a database. First you must connect to MySQL.

$ mysql --user=root --password
Enter password: 
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 23
Server version: 5.1.67 Source distribution

Copyright (c) 2000, 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql>

Create a new database using the following command.

mysql> create database mydatabase;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

mysql>

You can see the current databases using the following command.

mysql> show databases;
+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| information_schema |
| mydatabase         |
| mysql              |
+--------------------+
3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

To switch between databases using the following command.

mysql> use mydatabase;
Database changed
mysql>

You can make new connections directly to the database as follows.

$ mysql --user=root --database=mydatabase --password
Enter password: 
Welcome to the MySQL monitor.  Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MySQL connection id is 24
Server version: 5.1.67 Source distribution

Copyright (c) 2000, 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.

Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its
affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective
owners.

Type 'help;' or '\h' for help. Type '\c' to clear the current input statement.

mysql> select database();
+------------+
| database() |
+------------+
| mydatabase |
+------------+
1 row in set (0.00 sec)

mysql>

For more information see:

Hope this helps. Regards Tim...

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